As the clinking of a whisk and bowl echoes throughout Palo Alto High School sophomore Tyler Wong’s kitchen, the sweet smell of crushed Graham Crackers and squeezed limes wafts through the air. Wong is preparing the ingredients for his popular pies — starting each one from scratch. 

Though many students love baking in their free time, Wong has turned his hobby into a fundraising project and business.

Wong first began baking for his friends and family when he was in the sixth grade, after watching baking contests such as the Food Network’s “Kids Baking Championship.”

“I often brought baked goods like cakes and ice cream for my classmates at school, which they’re always happy about,” Wong said.


“I often brought baked goods like cakes and ice cream for my classmates at school, which they’re always happy about.”

— Tyler Wong, junior


In August 2020, Wong started baking his famous key lime pies from scratch using his secret recipe. 

“My mom suggested that I help do something to fundraise money for people less fortunate that were heavily affected by COVID,” Wong said. 

Wong started off baking only three to six key lime pies a week, donating his pies to be sold at Ada’s Cafe, a local nonprofit that supports people with disabilities.

“I felt like it was a great organization to support,” Wong said. “Besides providing jobs and teaching them [people with disabilities] and supporting them along the way, they [Ada’s Cafe] also donate to larger nonprofits.”

Within two months, he jumped from baking up to 12 pies a week to baking  up to 30.


“That [increasing the amount of pies] really allowed me to fundraise at a larger scale, and help my community more, along with doing something I really enjoy doing.”

— Tyler Wong, junior


“That [increasing the amount of pies] really allowed me to fundraise at a larger scale, and help my community more, along with doing something I really enjoy doing,” Wong said.

Wong also started his own business called Ty’s Pies where he now sells his pies for $30.

 “I sell the pies directly to customers through a form that I send out on Facebook, my Instagram and Nextdoor to reach my neighbors,” Wong said.

Wong donates two-thirds of the profit from these direct orders to the Ecumenical Hunger Program.

“The wonderful service they bring to everyone is something I haven’t seen in a lot of places,” he said.

Wong has raised $7,000 for the EHP in two years, and plans to take his business even further.


“My baking is a great way to show love for the community and help the community and support the community for all it’s given me and to continue to give to other people.”

— Tyler Wong, junior


“I hope to expand to other restaurants and to some new varieties,” Wong said. “I’m creating some more pies to add to the menu, and they will release sometime soon.”

Although baking pies requires eight hours per week, Wong tries to find time for it outside of his schoolwork, photography and basketball.

“It [fundraising] makes me feel good,” Wong said. “My baking is a great way to show love for the community and help the community and support the community for all it’s given me and to continue to give to other people.”